Urban planning and gender: for a more egalitarian city

Barcelona Metròpolis. Have you given any thought to how women and men use the city? The dossier Urban planning and gender proposes how to rethink the city to balance between women and men both productive and care-giving tasks.

Have you given any thought to how women and men use the city? The dossier Urban planning and gender proposes how to rethink the city to balance between women and men both productive and care-giving tasks. This, and much more, in 104 issue of Metròpolis magazine.

Men move around the city more for occupational reasons, while for women it’s primarily for family reasons. Women take on the care-giving burden, and have suffered more than men in terms of long-term unemployment and labour market instability. Cities have been planned with a focus on the labour market and the economy instead of on public services, schools or health, social and welfare centers and so on.

In this context, urban planning for everyday life works to put the care of people at its heart as an activity that creates social value, not just market value. And this is explained by the articles in the “Urban planning and gender” dossier, which outline the primary issues that must be addressed on this journey: issues related to mobility, labour and safety as well as combating the feminisation of poverty and tackling the problems caused by gentrification.

Urban art and invisible contaminants

Barcelona Metròpolis 104 issue includes two repors. On one hand, “Barcelona and urban art, an achievable entente” analyzes the tempestuous relationship between urban artists, the authorities and the public Over a 30-year period, from 1988 when the legendary mural Safari spray was painted with authorisation from the City Council in Gràcia.

On the other hand, “Decontaminating the bodies of city-dwellers” explains the scientifci evidences on the existence of endocrine disruptors. These substances -found in food, cleaning products, cosmetics, etc.- which all build up in the body, contribute to obesity, diabetes, cancer, fertility issues and brain development. While most governments look away, some cities are prioritising the job of decontaminating the bodies of their inhabitants.

Transformative women: form art to economy

In this issue of Metròpolis you could also read about woman who aspire to transform the city from their profession. We include an interview to Simona Levi, playwright and activist, who works to improve democracy in the digital age and to make values such as transparency and participation a reality.

You will also find the defence of the entrepreneurial state made by Mariana Mazzucato on her way through Barcelona; the Italian american economist has carved out a significant niche for herself in academic circles by debunking the big ideological myths surrounding private enterprise.

We look back at Aurora Bertrana, the woman and her work, much-celebrated author during the years of the Spanish Republic and largely neglected after. And we discover the urban visions of artists from very different cultures that have come through Associació Jiwar, behind a project that stands for vindication of neighbourhood values.

All this and more, in the last issue of Barcelona Metròpolis.