Travelling air quality information points and the new Low Emission Zone

The information points offer details on the quality of the city's air, the impacts on health and data on the new low emission zone encompassing the ring roads, which will come into force on 1 December with a view to protecting the quality of the city's air.

Within the framework of the information campaign regarding municipal measures to protect the quality of the air we breathe and to overcome pollution, Barcelona City Council plans on setting up two travelling information points between 23 October and 15 December, which will visit the city’s different neighbourhoods.

The information points offer details on the quality of the city’s air, the impacts on health and data on the new low emission zone encompassing the ring roads, which will come into force on 1 December with a view to protecting the quality of the city’s air.

Between 23 and 27 October, the points will visit the Hostafrancs, Sants, Dreta de l’Eixample, Fort Pienc and Sagrada Família neighbourhoods.Gradually, before the end of the year, they will visit the city’s other districts.

The fight against pollution is a priority

The Low emission zone encompassing the ring roads is a new boundary spanning more than 95 km2 including Barcelona and the municipalities surrounding the ring roads where Barcelona City Council plans to gradually restrict the use of the most polluting vehicles, starting on 1 December 2017.

Over the course of 2017 and through to 2020, this restriction will only apply to cars that have not been awarded the DGT tag and vans producer prior to Euro1 on days in which pollution events are declared by the Generalitat regional government of Catalonia.

Over 200 European cities already have low emission zones, which restrict access to the most polluting vehicles, as one of the most effective measures for improving air quality.

Air pollution is one of the European Union’s main public health problems. It causes 300,000 premature deaths every year.Motor-vehicle traffic is the main cause of the high pollution levels recorded in Barcelona.

There are occasional peaks in air pollution, but the daily levels of particulates (PM10) and pollutant gases (NO2) in the city are too high, subjecting the population to harmful air pollution every day.